Racism and White Male Privilege

privilege

One of my favorite websites now is “Upworthy,” a progressive website that focuses on pointing out hypocrisy and passing along inspirational stories and snippets.  It’s not the usual stuff – it’s usually snippets that inspire or surprise.   In this case a young woman shows her particular take on the George Zimmerman case:

Some people disagreed with my refusal to condemn the jury verdict in the Zimmerman case.   Yet I agree in the reaction of anger at how a case like this symbolizes the ongoing persistent racism in our society.

The verdict of this particular trial is irrelevant.  In fact, if Zimmerman had been found guilty it would be easy for people to praise the justice system and believe that punishing this “bad guy” shows that we’re past racism and those who are not are penalized if they act on their biases.  That is not the case.

We live in a society based on white privilege.   It’s not always through conscious acts of racism; often it’s an embedded structural aspect of the economy.   That feeds bigotry.  Rather than looking at how opportunities and constraints are structured into the fabric of society people say “if they made different choices they’d be successful, they must be lazy/dumb/inferior.”  The winners of the game always take credit for winning, even if the game was stacked in their favor.

Just as a black man has a very different reality than a white man, even if all other things are equal, the same is true for men and women.   That hit me years ago when I was working on my dissertation and would walk home from the University of Minnesota Poli-Sci computer lab at 10:00 at night.  It wasn’t the safest walk for me either – once crossing a bridge near the Metrodome a guy I was jogging up to spun around and pulled a switch blade on me.  Turns out he was scared – he thought the footsteps coming fast were a threat.   We both laughed.

But for women the idea of such a walk after dark would be a much different risk, as would going into the parking ramp late at night alone.   Whether it is blatant bigotry (“Women can’t do thinking work like men can,”), overt sexism (“I won’t hire a woman for this job because she’ll just get pregnant and quit or want leave”), or actual danger from rape (with the women often being blamed for the violent acts of men), women continually experience a different reality than men.   White men like me often don’t perceive it because we are myopic – we know the world as we experience it, we assume others experience it the same way.

That often leads to a weird form of privileged victim mentality.   I remember once when a colleague found out that a woman got a job he had made the short list for, he said “she got it because she was a woman.”   I interjected that every man who was in the running for that job might make that same claim but can’t all be right, and he just grunted.  Easier to feel slighted.

Yet at top levels of business, government and most of society it’s still a white male dominated world.   White men like myself don’t notice the privilege because we think it natural.   We think everyone gets treated like us, or if they don’t, they must be getting special advantages.  We ignore the fact that inequality between black and white has been growing dramatically since the 1980s.  Or worse we may feel its deserved.

It also comes through in obnoxious behavior.   When President Obama points out the reality of racism in modern America in a speech praised for its timeliness and vision, spoiled white privileged rich folk like James Wood lets forth a twitter diatribe, comparing the fact he has to pay more taxes (poor James!) to the plight of black folk like Trayvon Martin.   Others accuse Obama of “playing the race card” just by pointing out that race matters.   No says the privileged elite, don’t mention that, we prefer our privilege to remain unmentioned and hopefully unnoticed!

Probably not so much a racist as someone who doesn't want to be reminded of his privileged position in society as a white male

Probably not so much a racist as someone who doesn’t want to be reminded of his privileged position in society as a white male

I doubt he’s an overt racist.   Like so many of us white males, we’re so used to privilege that we don’t like being reminded that we benefit from it.   But the truth is that reality is different for women than men, and for whites than blacks.  That difference is rooted in real social conditions, not just psychological predispositions.

I have no doubt things are better in 2013 than they were in 1963, and that things will continue to improve.   The same is true for many groups marginalized or suffering bigotry.   After all, is there much difference between Nazi anti-Semites who attacked Jews and supposed Christian Conservatives who attack gay rights?   Consider the rants by some baseball fans about Marc Anthony – a New York born American citizen – singing the national anthem at the all star game.   Sounds like what some Germans might have said if a Jew had sung at the 1936 Berlin Olympics!

Cases like the Zimmerman case shouldn’t have us fixating on one person, nor is it really primarily a sign of a broken justice system.  It’s a sign of a culture that is still profoundly racist in its social structures, even if people consciously deny that racial component.  We’ve come a long way towards equality on so many dimensions in the last fifty years.  Americans can be proud of what we’ve accomplished, with the advance of gay rights being the latest victory for freedom.

blackwhite

The Zimmerman case and the reality of embedded white male privilege simply reminds us that we still have a long way to go – and the hardest part is to change how we think, not just the laws.

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  1. #1 by lbwoodgate on July 23, 2013 - 12:10

    “White men like myself don’t notice the privilege because we think it natural. We think everyone gets treated like us, or if they don’t, they must be getting special advantages.”

    BINGO!

    And the cartoon at the bottom is spot on too. Excellent post Scott. It kind of filled in some holes in my post you linked to also. Thanks.

    • #2 by Scott Erb on July 23, 2013 - 14:16

      Thanks – your post was an inspiration for mine!

  2. #3 by pino on July 23, 2013 - 12:56

    The winners of the game always take credit for winning, even if the game was stacked in their favor.

    You keep saying that, but I don’t think you know what that means.

    Can you give me an example of “the game being stacked in their favor”?

    We ignore the fact that inequality between black and white has been growing dramatically since the 1980s.

    Do you think that unmarried mothers are a symptom of poverty or a cause of it?

    • #4 by Scott Erb on July 23, 2013 - 14:15

      No, unmarried mothers are a result of the structural economic stacking of the deck. It’s very basic. Those with privilege have the capacity to give their children a much better chance of success. They then live alongside others of similar high socioeconomic status, and have better schools, create laws that protect themselves, and in the case of race, ignore how slavery and years of massive (and continuing) discrimination the deck is stacked against minorities.

      Classic real world example. I knew a kid in college whose dad was extremely rich. This kid was lazy – was happy to get C’s. Skipped class to watch his soaps. But he’s now rich because he inherited his dad’s companies and their managerial staff. He’s smart enough not to mess with that formula. Now, if a kid was born to a poor family, esp. black and in the ghetto, and the kid was that lazy, no way would he be wealthy. Most cases aren’t that extreme, but you get the picture: your opportunities and constraints vary depending on your position of birth. Be born white and male, you have more opportunities and few constraints, on average, then someone born black and/or female. I don’t even think this is controversial, at least not in social science.

      • #5 by pino on July 23, 2013 - 15:21

        No, unmarried mothers are a result of the structural economic stacking of the deck.

        Fascinating.

        They then live alongside others of similar high socioeconomic status

        This is a recent phenomenon. As society is getting better at sorting by intelligence we are creating a society that matches like minds with like minds.

        But he’s now rich because he inherited his dad’s companies and their managerial staff.

        What did they say, “shirt sleeves to shirt sleeves in 3 generations.”

        The kid will not stay in business long and by the time his kids come around; they’ll be as poor as grandpa was when he started that company.

        Be born white and male, you have more opportunities and few constraints, on average, then someone born black and/or female. I don’t even think this is controversial, at least not in social science.

        Yeah, I think you’re right. I would say, however, that the advantage of being born male is fading – most degrees are being awarded to women now. Interesting to see how the sexual discrimination of that past that worked against women has turned; it is men that are being discriminated against on today’s college campuses.

        And being born black, again, it’s tougher than it should be, but less so than it once was.

        Back to unwed mothers, back when racism much much MUCH more overt and crippling, the black family was largely intact with both moms and dads present in the household – and married.

        Now, as the racism of the past has to a large degree faded away, we see nearly 75% of all black children born to single moms. How is it possible to blame that on a “stacking of the deck”? The deck is dramatically less stacked than before yet the plight of the black family has perhaps never been more in danger.

      • #6 by Thales on July 26, 2013 - 11:24

        Unmarried mothers are the result of fatherlessness, a consequence of left-wing “progress” — the cultural (secular) and economic (welfare) shift away from patriarchy. As the famous black commedian, Chris Rock, says, it’s a father’s duty to keep his daughter “off the pole.” That is, to keep her chaste so that a man of quality will commit to her, his children and his civilization going forward. The alternative is what we now see among the underclass in significant percentages in all races: the unchecked female id chasing the non-comitting alpha studs.

      • #7 by lbwoodgate on July 26, 2013 - 12:15

        “What did they say, “shirt sleeves to shirt sleeves in 3 generations.”
        <

        That's a bumper sticker slogan Pino. Not empirical evidence. The sentiment may have some truth to it but I don't think it would hold up as the norm for that population – wealthy inheritors. Unless of course you've seen some data on this you can share with us.

      • #8 by lbwoodgate on September 1, 2013 - 10:10

        “As the famous black commedian, Chris Rock, says, it’s a father’s duty to keep his daughter “off the pole.”

        Even those young females raised in a fatherless family? I’m not sure you have a full grasp of the life of blacks who live in dire poverty Thales. Your assessment is reasonable only to the point that inclusive, real life factors accommodate it.

    • #9 by lbwoodgate on July 26, 2013 - 12:10

      “Can you give me an example of “the game being stacked in their favor”?”

      Seriously Pino? You think those children “born to the manor” don’t have an automatic advantage over those born to the ghetto? That’s naive even for you. You’d have to be in denial to miss that obvious example.

  3. #10 by bravesmartbold on July 23, 2013 - 23:51

    It’s “how we think, not laws.” That’s the problem. How we think will dictate the law, at least eventually.

  4. #11 by Titfortat on July 24, 2013 - 03:21

    But for women the idea of such a walk after dark would be a much different risk, as would going into the parking ramp late at night alone.(Scott)

    You may be right when it comes to the racism part but you are way off base when it comes to the threat of violence. Men are by far more likely to suffer random violence than women. Even looking into statistics on Domestic violence the threat is almost 50/50. Methinks you have a little sexist still lurking somewhere in your brain. 😉

    • #12 by Scott Erb on July 25, 2013 - 22:37

      I disagree. Note the comment from “Girl for Animal Liberation” below. Even if statistically men are more likely to suffer random violence, men don’t perceive it. Women are worried about rape (which is worse than mere random violence) and feel more vulnerable. Their reality is different.

      • #13 by pino on July 25, 2013 - 22:55

        So, if women fear rape and profile men, is that sexism?

        What if a man fears assault and profiles black men? How is that wrong but women profiling men not?

        Be consistent.

      • #14 by Scott Erb on July 26, 2013 - 06:36

        It is perverse to suggest that since we live in a rape culture where women have to fear possible assault that somehow they are “sexist” for being careful. That is only something a privileged white male could even consider making a modicum of sense. Women are being careful, they aren’t profiling. They are dealing with reality. You are showing that you really don’t understand this, Pino. You are safe as a white male to abstract this and play word games – and that proves my point!

      • #15 by Titfortat on July 26, 2013 - 09:21

        Scott

        We don’t live in a rape culture. Over 96% of men don’t rape. To allow the 4% to dictate what type of culture it is is absolutely ludicrous. I think as a culture we would be better served as to why we are so violent in general. Figure that out first and you may see better results on the rape part. As far as men not perceiving violence you again show your ignorance. Maybe in your world it wasn’t evident but in mine and the vast majority of male friends I know it was quite evident. You drank the lemonade sir.

      • #16 by Scott Erb on July 26, 2013 - 09:45

        We do live in a culture that accepts rape, treats the victims as if they can’t be trusted, and makes things very difficult for women. So I disagree with your claim it’s not a rape culture (the number of men that rape is not relevant. More rapes are unreported than reported because of the trauma the process causes. I think as white males, we just don’t get it. It takes real effort and some cognitive dissonance.

      • #17 by Thales on July 26, 2013 - 12:49

        Our culture does not accept rape — it punishes the act by law, a highly rationalized system which seeks to balance the privacy of the accuser against the presumptive innocence of the accused.

      • #18 by Titfortat on July 26, 2013 - 16:31

        Scott

        Tell you what. You live in your world of white man guilt and I will live in my world of not accepting rape and defending the innocent whenever I can. This is the world that my male and female friends live in. I cant even fathom what your world is like, I just don’t want to be lumped into it, thank you very much.

      • #19 by Scott Erb on July 26, 2013 - 16:36

        Who is talking guilt? That’s silly, no one is saying anything about guilt. I’m dealing with reality, you’re trying to deny it. Perhaps you feel a twinge of guilt? There is no need, and no need to twist reality to try to avoid confronting the truth that we do have a rape culture and reality is very different for women. You can admit that without feeling guilty!

      • #20 by Titfortat on July 26, 2013 - 17:38

        Scott

        I don’t believe we have a rape culture, not one iota. I do believe we have a problem with violence and rape and sexual assault is part of that problem. The issue I have is you seem to think that women have it worse than men. I think your view is sexist, completely. You obviously do not agree with me, which is ok. By the way, the reason I think you have a guilt issue is because you use the term “white male” when you address certain things. You may have been right about something. Cognitive dissonance.

      • #21 by Scott Erb on July 26, 2013 - 22:34

        We’ll have to disagree on this. I don’t think it’s sexist, I think I’m recognizing reality – that the fear of rape and violence means women live in a different world than men, and that when rape does occur (and I know some former rape victims, none of which felt it was in their interest to report it since the system is stacked against them) the woman suffers more than the men. I think that’s the world we have, built on male dominance in society for centuries. It is getting better, but I think recognizing the reality of inequality is not at all sexist.

        I also am fine recognizing my own privileges as a white male without feeling guilt about them. Guilt is a very destructive emotion, I don’t do guilt. It just seems obvious to me that I’m part of a privileged group who structurally has it better than most others in society, all other things being equal. One can recognize their advantages without feeling guilty about them!

      • #22 by Titfortat on July 27, 2013 - 03:40

        Scott

        We will disagree. I will say this though. You do a disservice to both men and women when you assume(sexism) all women fear something and all men don’t. It is so much more gray than your black and white idea. I know many women that could kick your ass and I know a ton of men who would wilt at the first sign of aggression. You can bet their view of the world is very different from the one you see. By the way, the vast majority of sexual assault is done by individuals who know the victim. Walking down the street it rarely happens. As far as physical beatings, I bet you have seen plenty in your life(the vast majority against males), especially on University Campuses. Can you imagine receiving one and the fear it would instill in you?

  5. #23 by Titfortat on July 24, 2013 - 03:28

    On the racism part I find this interesting. If you have one parent who is black and the other white you are most often considered black. Zimmerman’s mother is from Peru. Zimmerman considers himself a Latino. If we follow the first format then Zimmerman is not technically white.

    • #24 by Thales on July 26, 2013 - 11:33

      An all-female court acquits a Latino of murdering a black guy…and it’s the “white man’s” fault.

  6. #25 by Girl for Animal Liberation on July 24, 2013 - 07:22

    Great post, Scott.

    I commute in/out of Boston 5 days a week. Sometimes after work I go out for drinks with co-workers; however, I have a hard time relaxing. Why? Because I’m always watching the clock, keeping the train schedule in mind, knowing full well that by the time the train arrives at my station stop, I’ll be walking home, in the dark, and the walk is just under a mile. As a woman, I’m always hyper-aware of my surroundings, especially at night when I’m alone. I think it is ingrained in us at a very young age.

  7. #26 by Snoring Dog Studio on July 24, 2013 - 07:59

    Excellent post, Scott. The Zimmerman case IS a sign of a broken justice system and, absolutely, a real world example of racism embedded in that system. We have a remarkably long way to go. A Washington Post poll showed that a small majority of whites believed that the verdict was just. Since the trial, I’ve read far, far too many comments that start with “Trayvon was hardly an innocent man” as though none of us have things lurking in our backgrounds that dance around the edges of illegal, immoral, unethical, or dangerous. AND as though Trayvon deserved his murder. Further, I take real issue with the sentiment expressed by people who believe that single mothers bring on their own misery, as though they can be immune to the racism and inequalities in their environment and the social and financial disparities that work against them from the moment of birth. Well done, Scott. It was a good followup to the previous post.

    • #27 by pino on July 25, 2013 - 12:05

      The Zimmerman case IS a sign of a broken justice system

      I can understand the feeling that “something is wrong here” when it comes to the whole story, but can you explain how the verdict is indicative of a broken justice system?

      • #28 by Thales on July 26, 2013 - 11:51

        I am certain he won’t get around to that. I looked at the evidence, the jury definitely looked at the evidence, and there simply wasn’t enough evidence to prove murder or manslaughter.

        It was misadventure, not malice. The only narrative that would suggest a conviction for Zimmerman was the narrative the Left was constructing by the media and Left-wing activists that Zimmerman was out to harm Martin. There was no evidence for this. All evidence showed that Martin started the physical confrontation and that Zimmerman was in fear for his life. That is why the initial investigation by the police did not warrant an arrest for Zimmerman, the trial was a political show-trial, and Zimmerman was ultimately acquitted by a judge and jury, not of white men — but of women of various ethnicities, that looked at the evidence objectively.

        Kudos to Scott for making peace with all of that. I must give credit where it is due.

      • #29 by lbwoodgate on September 1, 2013 - 10:05

        “All evidence showed that Martin started the physical confrontation and that Zimmerman was in fear for his life.”

        That’s really not all that apparent as it may seem to you Thales. Martin’s actions could have equally been based on fear of his life from what he thought was a stalker. A black man’s reactions to what he perceived can be equally wrong too as was Zimmerman’s of a black man with a hoodie.

  8. #30 by pino on July 26, 2013 - 10:12

    It is perverse to suggest that since we live in a rape culture where women have to fear possible assault that somehow they are “sexist” for being careful.

    Scott, if anything, you are the one showing your ignorance of the situation, not me. I did NOT say that women are sexist for profiling men. I simply said how can you call one example “being careful” and the other “racist”.

    You can’t.

    It ABSOLUTELY makes sense for women to take precautions, walk the lit side of the street and to watch out for sketchy men at night.

    So, if there is a neighborhood where young black men are committing crimes, it makes sense to watch young, strange black men.

    I think as white males, we just don’t get it. It takes real effort and some cognitive dissonance.

    You don’t sound like you don’t get it. You sound like WE don’t get it but that you somehow do.

    • #31 by lbwoodgate on July 26, 2013 - 12:27

      “So, if there is a neighborhood where young black men are committing crimes, it makes sense to watch young, strange black men.”

      Watching yes. Acting on it; not so much. A neighborhood watch is supposed to restrict themselves to observe and report. Zimmerman crossed that line the moment he disregarded the police dispatcher’s instructions and stepped out of the security of his truck.

      But here’s something to consider too. If you take the premise that mostly black men were robbing your neighbors then are you guilty of something that parallels racism if those are the only types you watch? Zimmerman indicated this was a motivation of his when he told the police dispatcher “THESE people always get away with this”.

      • #32 by Thales on July 26, 2013 - 12:43

        “are you guilty of something that parallels racism if those are the only types you watch?”

        Those were not the only “types” Zimmerman was “watching.”

      • #33 by pino on July 26, 2013 - 13:32

        A neighborhood watch is supposed to restrict themselves to observe and report.

        I think that’s what he did. When Treyvon left his vision, he got out of the truck and followed. When the 911 agent told him that they did not need him to follow Treyvon, he stopped following him and went back to his truck.

        If you take the premise that mostly black men were robbing your neighbors then are you guilty of something that parallels racism if those are the only types you watch?

        Certainly. But there is no indication or suggestion that Zimmerman saw and ignored young white men in hoddies.

        THESE people always get away with this”.

        The words were “punks” not “people”. However, I’m not sure that makes Zimmerman a racist. In fact, I don’t even know what you think that means?

      • #34 by lbwoodgate on July 27, 2013 - 06:45

        “I think that’s what he did. When Treyvon left his vision, he got out of the truck and followed.”

        Actually Zimmerman got out of the truck before he lost sight of Martin

        At 7:13, two minutes into Zimmerman’s call, he tells the police operator: “S -, he’s running.”

        A beeping sound is heard, indicating that he has opened his car door. Zimmerman went after Trayvon and, out of breath, muttered profanities. He lost sight of him.

        “Are you following him?” the operator asked.

        “Yeah.”

        “OK, we don’t need you to do that.”

        SOURCE: http://web.archive.org/web/20120401180048/http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/03/31/143783/at-heart-of-trayvon-martin-death.html#storylink=cpy

        “But there is no indication or suggestion that Zimmerman saw and ignored young white men in hoddies.”

        Well when you make comments like that I could just as easily say there is “no indication or suggestion that Zimmerman did see but ignored young white men in hoddies”. I made no declaration but was simply implying that whites, in hoodies or not, probably didn’t attract Zimmerman’s attention as a young black man would. That of course would only make sense because of the crimes committed there the only ones seen or caught were black. But it doesn’t mean that other crimes were not committed by whites, does it?

        “The words were “punks” not “people”. However, I’m not sure that makes Zimmerman a racist. In fact, I don’t even know what you think that means?”

        No, you’re not sure, which means you’re equally not sure that he wasn’t. Nor do I. I never tried to make that claim. My reference to it suggested that some racism probably played in with this tragedy. If you’re familiar with race relations between latinos and blacks you will know there is no loved lost between the two. They do not share a common bond with each other simply because their skins are non-white. For the record I have never viewed Zimmerman as a racist killer.

  9. #35 by Titfortat on July 26, 2013 - 17:47

    Pino

    Zimmerman profiled him, plain and simple. He is guilty as shit for being a moron and shooting someone. Fortunately for him the prosecutor’s were idiots. Case closed, legal justice was served.

    • #36 by pino on July 26, 2013 - 20:21

      Zimmerman profiled him, plain and simple. He is guilty as shit for being a moron and shooting someone.

      I agree, he did profile him. However, I think that we all profile people all day everyday.

      Zimmerman saw a young black man, dressed and acting suspiciously. Further, he didn’t recognize him.

      If I lived in a neighborhood victimized by crime at the hands of young black men, I would notice and follow Martin too. In fact, I’d probably call the police – maybe.

      I think of the whole night in scenes:

      1. The “seeing”
      2. The following
      3: The Disengage
      4. The encounter
      5. The fight
      6. The conclusion

      1. Zimmerman saw Treyvon, followed him and called 911
      2. Zimmerman lost sight of Martin and follwed on foot.
      3. 911 told Zimmerman we don’t need you to follow him – Zimmerman stopped and made his way back to his truck
      4. Martin, fearing a “Creepy-ass cracker” engaged Zimmerman, “Jumping out of the bushes …”
      5. Martin proceeded to beat the hell out of Zimmerman.
      6. Zimmerman, fearing for his life, shot him.

      What crime do you think Zimmerman is guilty of?

  10. #37 by Titfortat on July 27, 2013 - 03:30

    What crime do you think Zimmerman is guilty of?(Pino)

    First off, I don’t think Zimmerman follows a young black male at night UNLESS he has a gun. We can debate the level of which Zimmerman may have been on the receiving end of violence but in my world(I have been on the receiving end and dishing out end) there is no way in hell someone deserved to be shot and killed for it. I think Zimmerman panicked and pulled the gun and accidentally shot Martin. We will never know for sure. I don’t think he intended to do it but he definitely put himself in harms way and set the cycle in motion himself. Accidental shooting due to stupidity. He should be in jail for Manslaughter.

    • #38 by Thales on July 28, 2013 - 12:01

      “Accidental shooting due to stupidity.”

      That is your idle speculation.

  11. #39 by Alan Scott on July 28, 2013 - 10:08

    Titfortat,

    You have zero evidence to support your speculation that the shooting was an accident. The physical evidence shows that Zimmerman intended to shoot Trevon Martin. There is no Manslaughter. It’s either murder or self defense.

  12. #40 by Titfortat on July 28, 2013 - 10:26

    Alan

    Actually there is not enough evidence for either(I believe accident is much more likely). They could have been just as easily wrestling and Zimmerman had the gun out already and it discharged. But as far as your idea of self defense, look back at what I have posted. Anyway you look at it though the one common denominator is this. Zimmerman set the cycle in motion.

  13. #41 by Alan Scott on July 28, 2013 - 12:55

    Titfortat,

    You keep speaking of cycles. If that were a basis for anything, all of us would be in trouble. Every time you get into your car you put yourself in harms way. Twice in my life I had drivers cross the center line and hit me head on. By your logic I caused those accidents because I chose to be on the highway.

    The evidence was that Trevon was on top of Zimmerman, bouncing his head off the concrete. The evidence was that Trevon would not have stopped beating Zimmerman until he was comatose or dead.

  14. #42 by Alan Scott on July 28, 2013 - 13:10

    I need to correct my words. I meant that the evidence showed that Zimmerman believed Trevon was not going to stop beating him.

  15. #43 by Titfortat on July 28, 2013 - 18:43

    Chasing someone with a gun in your backside because you “think” they look suspicious is not driving your car on the highway. Come on Alan, you seem like a smart guy, most times.

  16. #44 by Lee on February 3, 2014 - 13:35

    I don’t recall stepping on a Black guy to get my success in university. Being in Canada especially, considering there are barely any Black people here. I could be wrong though. Maybe there was some mythical Black guy that I stepped on to get success in my life. And here I was just thinking it was hard work and studying getting me there.

  17. #45 by Sherman sherridan on October 7, 2014 - 17:39

    Yes please tell mo more about how my northern farmer ancestors got ahead in life because their southern competitors hade free labor

  1. White Privilege | ELLIOT LAKE News

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